Maintenance

Subscribers want to know the packages they depend on will be maintained into the future. We provide a set of tools to help you better plan the long-term maintenance of your project.

See a walkthrough of these tasks.

Continue to actively maintain your project

You must continue to be (one of) the maintainers of your package, as long as you're signed on as a lifter. This should mean you're looking at issues that are coming in, thinking about what should be done with the package over time, and generally keeping it on track—whatever "on track" means for your package.

Some packages should be quite low-activity (if they're mature and users want stability), but even these need someone keeping an eye on them in case of a security vulnerability or other surprise. We don't expect pointless activity; we just need you to be responsible for the package.

Our hope, of course, is that eventually income from Tidelift frees up the bulk of your time to make your package amazing—whatever that means to you and your project community.

Versioning Scheme

Tidelift subscribers need your help to use the most appropriate version of your package, so we prompt you to indicate which versions are: active, receiving security fixes, or deprecated. In the future, we may require that active versions not rely on deprecated versions of other dependencies.

Please indicate which streams are safe for use until newer versions are available and which release streams are actively maintained. If you have an existing commitment to offer long-term support (LTS), let us know which streams(s) are supported and for how long. By default, new streams are considered safe for use until newer, as-safe or safer release streams exist.

Follow the Code of Conduct

You are required to follow our Code of Conduct in your interactions with subscribers, project contributors, Tidelift employees and other lifters.

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